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the economy back on track, in particular battling years of deflation here. you can imagine really on the defensive today refuting claims of currency manipulation made by germany's leader. this came after germany's chancellor said japan's easing monetary measures could devalue the yen. the finance minister denied the accusation. >> translator: japan is pursuing bold economic measures to pull the country out of deflation, not to manipulate the currency. >> the japanese currency is trading at its weakest level in two years and seven months. he said this is a sign that excessive strength of the yen is being corrected now. economic revitalization minister also said he in tends to seek more understanding regarding japan's financial policy at the annual meeting of the world economic forum. he's taking part in the meeting from saturday. >>> meanwhile the head of the bank of japan stressed the central bank will continue promoting seamless and powerful monetary easing. the governor gave an address in tokyo on friday pep said an inflation target and mormon tear easing to achieve it are neede
pockets, but we may be losing our competitive edge. some say it's because america's fragile economy is a distraction for corporate america. others point to our inferior infrastructure and sub-par public education. but adam segal, author of "advantage," says the big problem is others are gaining ground. >> we have been kind of running in place for the last three or four years because of the recession, spending on r&d, and big ideas seem to be fairly scarce while china just continues to funnel more and more money into it. >> reporter: still many argue the u.s. will always be extremely competitive because we are the most innovative country in the world. what better place to witness innovation at work than at i.b.m. in westchester county, new york. this is the home of watson, big blue's super computer. watson was clever enough to beat "jeopardy" champions at their own game just a few years ago. now, i.b.m. researchers are working on new uses for the brainiac computer, particularly in the field of medicine. bernie meyerson calls himself i.b.m.'s head geek. he says innovation is critical
>>> on our broadcast tonight, signs of life in the american economy. near record highs on wall street, a housing turn-around under way. the problem is, a lot of americans aren't feeling it yet. >>> there is a new outbreak to worry about, spreading like wildfire across our country. and unlike the flu, for this one there is no vaccine. >>> the dark cloud hanging over a big american city. doctors say the air is so bad, it's the equivalent of forcing every resident to become a heavy smoker. >>> and seeing red. a push by republicans to change the way we elect a president. if these had been the rules across the map in november, we would have president romney. >>> also, a big night for the biggest blockbuster of all-time. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >>> good evening. the evidence is now unmistakable. aspects of the u.s. economy after a long and difficult period of darkness appear to be getting more robust. and while there are lots of numbers out to prove the point of an improving economy,
must do better -- >> britain's economy shrank by 2.3%, worse than expected. i could make it more difficult, more expensive for it to borrow. since 2008, britain has emerged from the recession twice now, only to slide back into economic contraction, a double-dip recession. there has never been a triple- dip since the 1950's. actually, uk firms are still hiring people. >> when you look at employment, you have to look at the part of wage growth, and wage growth is negative in real terms. if you take into account inflation. the u.k.'s competitiveness is still improving, and that is why firms who are not getting the headline numbers are still willing to take people on. that is why you see this dichotomy between the employment situation, what is happening to the economy. >> u.k. figures are not good. how does the u.k. compared to continental europe? >> in terms of growth, it is difficult to compare because they go in and out of recession at different times. the unemployment is one of the key ones. britain has done remarkably well. it is something of a mystery, and it has to do with tha
on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university, we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ at devry.edu/knowhow. itbut sleep train's huge foyear eends sunday. salels, get beautyrest, posturepedic, even tempur-pedic mattress sets at low clearance prices. save even more on floor samples, demonstrators, and closeout inventory. plus, free same-day delivery, set-up, and removal of your old set. don't wait, sleep train's year end clearance sale ends sunday. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >> neil: all right. in the middle of earnings season, we don't give you every one, but we try to give you the ones that are cons quential or meaningful, google is considered such a barometer for t
& noble, dagen and connell. they will close a third of their stores. it is a tough economy. people are moving to digital. this may bode well for amazon.com. barnes & noble down nearly 2% today. barnes & noble say they will close one third of their stores over the next decade. let's take a look at the broader market. the dow down about ten points. much like the nasdaq composite and the s&p 500. they are all hovering near the unchanged line. the retail, drugged and bank index all have done okay with down arrows. connell: a team of a bipartisan senators have come together with their own plan on immigration reform. dagen: peter barnes is on capitol hill with the very latest. peter: this group of eight editors can't bipartisan group, for democrats, for republicans, trying to get out before the president speech tomorrow in nevada. now, the senator's proposal includes increase and verifiable border security and tracking of legal immigrants making sure that they believe when they are supposed to, mandatory employment verification, green cards for top floor and college students who are gett
about what's happening with the domestic economy. >> yeah. rates probably close to 50% in europe. europe obviously is a collection of smaller companies. if you're historically in those countries you've had to reach out much sooner than american companies have. they're global leaders in their industry around the world. they just happen to be based here in europe and one of our key messages of the last four years has been buy european countries and make sure they have as little exposure as possible. that's generally the message. there's more competition in the market now even from peripheral countries benefiting in the risk rally. >> i wonder about philips, too, reporting tomorrow. are they seen similar to alcoa as the barometer? >> i think, you know, any big company which comes out and meaningfully beats or disappoints the market, european equities are up .25% from the lows in the summer. it could be any number of big stocks which sets the near term direction of the market. overall, it's very unlikely. the corporate sector has within its power to greatly disappoint or please the markets a
. remember the virginia economy, a lot of places very dependent on defense and other industries, neither side will look good if they cannot make an agreement. it is a prediction but one that i don't necessarily think will be true. >> david cuts would have a serious drag on the economy estimates from a half a percent to a full point of gdp. someone is going to get the blame for that if it happens. who do you think blinks first? >> that is a good point. you may recall the pentagon was very concerned about this saying they would have to cut about $100 billion right off the bat. some of the officials went to the white house and said let's make a deal on this. there will be a lot of pressure to do that. republicans agreed to raise the debt ceiling. that took away a little bit of their leverage going into negotiations at the end of february. here comes paul ryan. where has he been? he is making this line in the sand now. i think the white house is concerned because this could hurt the economy going forward if we go through these deep cuts and right now the white house is saying we need to keep the
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
with their best strategy and the outcome for both the market and the economy. don't go anywhere. more "money" coming up. ♪ twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares re, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. lori: all right. back to business in washington now republicans hold a big vote to whether or not to extend the debt limit until may. if congress doesn't pass a budget by april 15th they no longer get paid! i have no problem with that. our panel is here with their take on the strategy. we have our favorite economist, peter morici. the always amazing scott martin, chief market strategist with united advisors and former democratic congressman
horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. sandra: you think our ranking crisis was ba back in 2008? it was, but imagine iceland. their three against banks failed. they just failed, the banks of the same leveraged that our state of the governments took the opposite approach of the u.s. so did the world end? hardly so, david. david: the world economic forum with a leader who had to make that tough choice. liz: david, the world hardly froze up and ended for iceland. sure, they had majo have major , 10% unemployment, 90% of the value lost, but today it is a much different story. we want to hear about this from the president of iceland. welcome, mr. president. >> thank you. liz: in the u.s. a lot of people still wonder what would have happened if we had let our banks fail. i know is a completely different scale, but talk about your experience and back then in 2800 google did was to allow something like that to happen. >> even though the scale is different in iceland, whether they are at large, small, they face simil
, i'll tell you who is paying for it. we're paying for it, the taxpayers. what they did to the economy put it into the tank and it was big stimulus package that had to pull us out of the tank. we're still doing that right now. i wish the doj would go after these folks and give some answer. i think that frontline documentary is outstanding. mike papantonio, good to have you with us tonight. thank you so much. that is "the ed show." i'm ed schultz. the rachel maddow show starts right now. >> thank you for joining us. happy friday. the detroit lions used to play in this building, the pontiac silverdome in once prosperous pontiac, michigan. after the lions left the silverdome and the pontiac factory moved and the town of pontiac went broke, they're tried to sell the stadium to the highest bidder. >> the field has seen monster truck rallies, soccer games. if it can happen on a field, kit happen here. >> out here at the silverdome, we have anything ranging from your dirt shows, snocross shows, home and garden show, trade shows, converts all the way down to anything you would like to do on to
the financial industry afloat was part of rescuing the overall economy. >> the president does not believe anything we do in washington is worthwhile if it doesn't have as part of the purpose strengthening our economy. providing more security for our middle class. >> the aides said it would have been worse without the president's program including legislation aimed to prevent future bail-out of institutions deemed too big to fail. not all agree how effective it will be. >> peter moresi believes the big investment houses are thriving but the average investor is not. >> if they buy a mutual fund they have a high probability of not keeping up with the market. if they buy the s&p index which is the market, it doesn't make progress. >> the white house says it's not fault of the recovery plan. the stimulus bill contain more tax cuts and less spending than the president's advisors wanted. jay carney says the compromise was the best they could get. >> the idea that we would have somehow garnered more support in congress for something different, is a misreading of history. >> most people agree unce
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
economy now that is slowly but surely- i am not going to say it's great- but it is better than it was, and i think that's helping that oil price, and i think that the market will shrug off anything from overseas right now. i think if it was a middle eastern problem, yes. but right now, not north korea. > there was a major fallout from apple's disappointing earnings. how much further will this stock fall, do you think? where is the bottom here? > > i think it could go probably another 10% more. i think it could be the $410, $400 level, because i think ultimately it has fallen out of favor. like sometimes a bar just becomes unpopular for no good reason. i think that has kind of happened to apple here. they have lost steve jobs obviously, they haven't had anything really new to roll out. so they are going to have to have some sort of event to stop the slide. > scott shellady of trean group. good to talk to you today. have a nice weekend. > > ok. all hands are on deck to get to the bottom of boeing's battery troubles. that's according to the national transportation safety board, which sai
areas of agreement between myself, i am a conservative, and don. we both agreed that this economy will do well because of energy. we both believe it is on the upswing because of housing. >> that is all you have to say? stuart: we also agree on taxes. >> we should have a free enterprise, free market system. stuart: why are you such a supporter of the most leftist president in american history? >> it is not just a chief financial officer, it is a leader of our nation. he has no peers when it comes to any other candidate on the republican side or any other republican sitting in the senate. we are out of time. connell: good morning, everyone. i am connell mcshane. dagen: i am dagen mcdowell. things are looking up on the jobs front. connell: monica crowley. dagen: dreamliner, the troubles have not gone away for boeing. michael dell has ordered one of them. connell: then there is jamie dimon and john chambers. you will be hearing from both of them in this hour. liz claman at the world economic forum. cheryl: stocks now and every 15 minutes. apple. nicole: i will show you apple in a mome
, is not president obama. the problem is us. we, the people. have to decide whether we want to market based economy or a allow the federal government to control commerce including healthcare. the president believes in equality. that would be nice. equality is great. if there is a heaven, i assume we will see it there. on earth, equality is impossible. you cannot equate an american who holds a ph.d. with a high school dropout. no matter what president obama tells us the two will never be equal in the market place. therefore, the president seems to want to change the marketplace, putting the federal government in charge of who gets what. even in the private sector. now, yesterday, he confidently stated that his so-called progressive view will bring the nation prosperity. but it has not and it will not. in fact, if america continues down the big spending road, this country could well go bankrupt. a very interesting question is why are so many americans accepting president president os vision when less than 30 years ago president reagan was the political icon? with reagan in mind. president obama made
shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decade
the budget, how to grow the economy. that's the kind of debate the country desevens. by the way, if we keep going down this path, we will have a debt crisis. it's not an if question, it's a when question. >> i remember him, alternativest young congressman from wisconsin that used to come on "squawk box." >> still fighting budget balthsds. >> if he's going to go on somewhere, at least he went on with david. congress must pass a stopgap spending bill by march 27th to keep the u.s. government running. and don't do that with your sneezes. >> what was that? i held it in. >> that's like -- >> i've been trying to hold it in because you were talking. >> no, no, it's going to come out. that's bad for you. something inside is going to pop or something. like an anneurism. it's bad to be repressed like that. let it out. >> that's his whole life. >> oh. >> let it out. >> michelle caruso ka brar ray. you're like a guest on the show, but thank you for being kind. >> it's the greatest feeling in the world. let it out. >> yeah, others have -- anyway, more trouble in egypt, a state of emergency has been decl
the count kraoe which has not occurred. we are more divided than before. and get the economy on a surround recovery to get out of a recession that we've had. the pieces of business hangover the president. he has proven that you can get reelected in a weak economy, which a lot of people, myself included thought would be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also cou
market economy and grow the business in a slow growth world economy. again, reflecting slow growth overall. i think they had strong numbers when it came to agency. some of those numbers up by 18%. volume was driven by agriculture with robust tales in latin america and a strong selling to the north american selling season along with increases in asia pacific for performance materials, electronics and communications and performance chemicals. >> the stock was higher a year and a half ago or so. but in terms of the last year, it's getting -- it's sort of the in the mid point of the trend. coming back, at least trying to get back to where it was earlier. all-time highs are at about 58. >> in corporate headlines, more developments in the boeing story. there are indications now that the dream liner could stay grounded longer than initially anticipated. investigators turning to the maker of the lithium ion batteries that are used in the planes. that is gsyausa. investigators visited the batterymaker yesterday. shares of boeing have started getting to the low end of the range after some ch
in the global economy despite some of the revenue company is headed into 2013. >> there is good news for renters, bay area rents are flattening out. according to a new survey of apartment complexes by " real sex ", written in the east bay, peninsula and san francisco were almost unchanged in the fourth quarter of 2012 and declined slightly in the south bay. experts say that red flag could be caused by some renters decided to buy homes since interest rates are so low. >> fremont wholefoods groundbreaking is scheduled for friday. the 39,000 square foot building is located at the corner of casio padre parkway and more right ave. another 13,000 square feet is being set aside for a another retailer. the fremont store will be the sixth store in the east bay. a date has not been released on when the store will be opened. >> the united nations say that more than 197 million people worldwide are without a job, and that another 39 million have given up looking for work. an annual report from the international labor ass organization says the unemployment will rise by 5.1 million this year. the u.s. and wor
'll tell what you, if the economy keeps getting better over the next three years, you've got hillary linton rclin running three years from now, we republicans have such a major headwind in our face for the next three years. it's going to be tough. >> yeah, there's no question. but there's so many variables. >> go ahead. >> no, so many variables that could happen in the next 3 1/2 years. >> yeah. ed sees you making a motion, he stops. >> i was trying to get richard haass in on this. >> she wants some more 'roids. >> andrea, i'm sorry, we cut you off. >> no, there are other points about the politics of it. joe biden is going to be at the white house, in closed meetings with the president today and has had a very high-profile role. clearly, this is the interview that he would have wanted to see. and when you talk to a lot of leading democrats who were in town this weekend, they were saying that joe biden has everything going for him except that hillary clinton is a woman and is a celebrity and has the best popularity. and she has the virtue, after eight years then of barack obama and the obama
minneapolis. >>> from weather to the economy, you hope the world economy is on wall street, but now in switzerland. many are in davos for the annual world economic forum but this year their focus is not on europe. anthony mason joins us from davos. anthony good morning. >> reporter: good morning, charlie. maybe it's the bracing mountain air but there's been a pronounced mood swing in davos. 12 months ago it looked like the financial collapse in europe could lead to a global recession. what a difference a year makes. in the hallways and meeting rooms of the world economic forum where top bankers, business leaders and politicians come every year to swap intelligence there's a sense the global economy has finally turned a corner. as ken frazier, ceo of pharmaceutical giant merck. >> i think the u.s. economy is poised to take off. i think it's been through some tough times. i think it's the strongest economy in the world. >> reporter: the imf forecasts the global economy will grow 3.5% this year a healthy number, and if there's debate about how soon things will ge
low, but a guest said, look, washington is going to mess up the economy. the sequestering issue is prevalent, and the debt ceiling debate is going to further erode consumer confidence, people will not spend, and the rally might be in jeopardy. i'm a real basking of hopefulness and positivity. >> thank you so much. the unions, lou dobbs weighs in on dwindling union membership, but to the point, there's a rally holding on, but a rally nonetheless. >> that's right. the s&p right now, which was above 1500, 1502 to be exact a short time ago, back to the levels we saw in 2007. we're trying to hang on to the rally, but thinking the dow was up more than a hundred points, and now it's up 3 dlsh 4 -- 41. >> will the markets hold on despite with what's going on with apple breaking down? clinging to green, approached the 1500 level not seen in years. if we end higher, that's the 7th consecutive day of gains, the longest winning streak in more than six years for the s&p. >> and no longer the apple of wall street's eye. it pummeledded as they posted the fourth most profitable company ever. >>
economy, the u.s. and pacific, here is what he said. >> the growth of the global economy, 3%, but the average of emerging markets, close to trend, 5%, and while advance economies are going to be growing barely 1%. and with an advanced economies, the euro zone, mostly in recession, uk is borderline recession, and even the united states, compared to other advanced economies growing in my rue is going to grow another year, a trend of 1.6%, 1.7%. keeps unemployment rate very high. >> reporter: and that's important. rate of growth, keeps unemployment very high in this country. key to all of that is some sort of grand bargain, grand deal in washington. not expecting that any time soon. outlook for housing improvement. but not as much as i think all of us would like to see. soledad. >> great, poppy. thanks for that. >>> ahead on "starting point." vice president biden begins his next four years, he reflects on his past term and his a-ha moment and why he decided to take on the nra. >>> she dated lance armstrong for years. sheryl crow is talking about armstrong's confession that, in
be in this order, number one, look at the numbers, number one by far, strengthening the economy. 86% say that's number one for them. number two, improving the job situation, 79% say that's what they want focused on and number three, reducing the budget deficit at 72%, that number on the budget deficit is up 20 points from when president obama started his term in office. so, those are the priorities of the american people. and does president obama have his eye on the ball? ng me now heidi harris, the host of the heidi harris show and if you look at the agenda items spelled out in the president's inaugural address because he's talking about gay rights and immigration reform and climate change, heidi, and the american people seem to be talking about something very different. >> they are, and it's interesting how he didn't spend any time at all on the economy, building bridges and roads, that's really not going to improve the economy and that's pretty much all he said about it in his speech. it shows that he's not listening to what the american people want. and doesn't surprise a lot of folks, hi
economy was not a growing economy. it was a stagnating economy. virginia's agricultural economy was not a growing economy. but a stagnating one. and the reason why so many slaves were sold out of the upper south to the lower south is because in many ways there weren't new slaves needed in virginia and maryland and north carolina, where they were needed were in the new cotton lands of the southwest, and so an owner quite often might have what he considered excess capacity, and so he would sell off one or two slaves here. almost always breaking up families, because what sold and brought money in the market place were people aged 15 to 30 years. and so that usually meant breaking up families. husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, mothers and fathers and their children. and they would be sent to richmond, which was a bit of a gathering place, and most of the slaves purchased in richmond were purchased not by slave owners but by other slave traders. so then would take them hundreds of miles away, either marching them overland where the men would be chained together two-by-two, th
to do. but he needs to get to work. and the number one problem is the economy. he's got to fix the economy. the fiscal situation has been fixed, to a large extent. the stock market's doubled. that's pretty good. but he has to get everybody working again. it means fix the economy. it means fix the education. so we're bringing kids along that have the skills for 21st century america. his focus has to be on the economy. on the need to reduce unemployment. and frankly, i hope he can, through his own example, restore a sense of civility in the country. >> every president learns a lot. is scarred by the office. also made more wise by the office. what is the one thing you hope president obama has learned over the last four years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all thi
descending on the tiny ski town off davos, switzerland for the world economic forum. the economy will be front and center as the group's founder has warned the world has not yet escaped the risk of economic collapse? do we ever. we have davos covered all week long. you will not want to miss a minute with liz claman. she sits down with richard gelfond, imac ceo. that is right here on fox business. she has a slew of guests. all the all-stars. lori: want to take a trip to a warmer climate? southwest airlines announcing well, it might cost you a little more especially if you want to board early. a $40 fee guaranties passengers get to be one of the first 15 people in line to board. travelers who want to be first on the plane can purchase the option at the gate up to 45 minutes before boarding. but space is limited. only 15 of these early passes will be sold. southwest, the nation's most popular domestic airline already charges $10 for early bird check-in service but early bird service improves your spot in the boarding queue. doesn't guaranty a specific spot like the fee will and grab
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
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